Plant Ecology

Ecology is the study of the relationships between living organisms and their environments, the interactions of organisms with one another, and the patterns and causes of the abundance and distribution of organisms in nature. The ecological studies of PELD 2000-2010 about the restinga vegetation of Parque Nacional da Restinga de Jurubatiba (PNRJ) increases the  Abelha em Allagoptera arenaria - Foto Tatiana Konnoknowledge about the structure of different vegetation formations, mainly in the stability of vegetation. These studies focused on Open Clusia Formations (FACL) which represents about 40% of the total area of the PARNA Restinga of Jurubatiba (Araújo et al., 2004). The studies presents a small group of species acting as nurse plants, modulating indirectly the structure of communities in a process called facilitation (Zaluar & Scarano, 2000). These plants are Allagoptera arenaria (Arecaceae), Aechmea nudicaulis (Bromeliaceae) and Clusia hilariana (Clusiaceae).

Our more recent studies (2011 to present) try to understand how the plant species interacts with each other and with groups of animals, observing the events on a long time scale in correlation with climate. Forte (2013), in turn, evaluated natural regeneration in restingas, considering past anthropogenic interferences vegetation. The main result of this study was the indication that other plants driving secondary succession in areas of FACL, in a distinct process described by the facilitation by nurse plants. Phenology of shrubs and trees were analyzed by Machado (2013). In general, the species present an annual flowering/fruiting pattern and are grouped in long day and short day plants. Humiria balsamifera being a species that offers resources continuously throughout the year. Brito (2015), through the analysis of the litter production, as well as the decomposition of the plant material of the different plant physiognomies propose a conceptual model capable of inferring the relative importance of the FACL and Periodically Flooded Forest (MPI) for the nutrient cycle in the restinga ecosystem. Vianna (2016)Amazilia fimbriata em Vriesia neoglutinosa- Foto Rogerio Peccioli continued the phenological record of some species already studied by Machado (2013) with a greater focus on the flora pollinated by bees and in the importance of pollen as resource. This study highlights the generalist character of both solitary and social bees and the role of herbaceous and shrub species among vegetation clumps as a source of pollen reward. Machado (2017) worked with hummingbirds and bromeliads pollination, which revealed the importance of Amazilia fimbriata as a pollinator of a group of non-ornithophilous plant species and the of the bromeliad Aechmea nudicaulis for the maintenance of hummingbird populations.

There are ongoing studies on the contribution of different species on litter production, and the role of facilitating species, considering the functional structure of the vegetation clumps, and on the contribution of the food resource, fruit, on the population dynamics of the endemic Rodentia Cerradomys goytaca.

 

 

Plamt Ecology Team

 

Luís Eduardo Guerra Domingos Nogueira (nogueira.luiseduardo@gmail.com)

Lattes: http://lattes.cnpq.br/1444931273531380

 

Rodrigo Lemes Martins (rodr.lemes@gmail.com)

Lattes: http://lattes.cnpq.br/9380597318217382

 

Tatiana Ungaretti Paleo Konno (tkonno@uol.com.br)

Lattes: http://lattes.cnpq.br/8152361597030695

 

Lísia Mônica se Souza Gestinari (lisiagestinari@gmail.com)

Lattes: http://lattes.cnpq.br/0770145420421898